Learn Numbers 1-100 with a Hundred Chart

headshot of author, Katie Wickliff

Author
Katie Wickliff

Published
September 1, 2023

Learn Numbers 1-100 with a Hundred Chart

headshot of author, Katie Wickliff

Author
Katie Wickliff

Published
September 1, 2023

Learn Numbers 1-100 with a Hundred Chart

headshot of author, Katie Wickliff

Author
Katie Wickliff

Published
September 1, 2023

Key takeaways

  • Use small household objects to help your child make ten groups of ten.
  • Count by 10s to 100 before counting by 1s.
  • Use a hundred chart to help students move from concrete math manipulatives to actual place values.

List of Numbers 1-100

Understanding the sequential order of numbers is a skill that students need to develop before moving on to more complex concepts, so learning to count to 100 is a huge accomplishment for a child. 

Want to help your student master the numbers 1 to 100? Introduce a hundred chart. This useful mathematical tool is a great way to develop counting skills. 

How to Count to 100

At first, students may find counting to 100 challenging or overwhelming. However, several methods will help them master this foundational math skill. Here are a few tips to help your child learn to count the numbers 1 to 100:

 

  • Collect physical objects that your child can easily count. Some ideas are pennies, Cheerios, or dried pasta noodles. Using these items as manipulatives helps build concrete number sense. 
  • Make counting to 100 less intimidating by breaking it down into smaller parts. It is much easier for your child to understand 100 as a pattern of 10s, rather than one large group of numbers. For example, make a pile of 10 Cheerios, and have your child count them. Then, make ten groups of ten Cheerios, and have your child count by 10s to reach 100. Practice counting by 10s using games, songs, and rhymes to cement their learning. 
  • Once your child can count by 10s to 100, introduce a hundred chart.

Counting to 100 with a Hundred Chart

A hundred chart is a 10×10 grid that displays the numbers 1 to 100 from smallest to largest. Using a hundred chart is a helpful tool that can make counting to 100 more manageable for students.

A 1-100 chart is very helpful for your child to see the numbers in order since many students get “stuck” when transitioning to the next group of ten. Using a hundred chart allows the student to see what group of ten comes next in the sequence. 

 

When introducing a hundred chart, it’s important to help your student notice the following:

  1. The grid has ten rows and ten columns.
  2. The numbers in the horizontal rows increase by 1s, while the numbers in the vertical columns increase by 10s.
  3. The numbers are read from right to left, beginning with the number 1 in the top left corner. 

 

This visual introduction to the hundred chart will help your student understand that the chart is a tool to help them count to 100.

Free Downloadable Hundred Chart

Download and print our helpful Hundred Chart to use with your student during counting practice. Then, head over to DoodleLearning’s math app for even more hundred chart practice.

Practice Problems

Now that we’ve learned about number lines, it’s time to practice. Complete the exercises below or head over to our math app to build more confidence in using number lines.

Doodle-Blog-NumberIcons_1

Place your finger on the purple number 10. Then, move your finger down the page and count aloud by 10s until you reach 100.

Doodle-Blog-NumberIcons_2

Using the hundreds chart, place your finger on the number 2. Now, find the number that is ten more than 2.

Doodle-Blog-NumberIcons_3

Using the hundreds chart, place your finger on the number 20. Now, find the number that is five less than 20.

Doodle-Blog-NumberIcons_4

Using the hundred chart below, fill in the missing numbers in the first row.

Doodle-Blog-NumberIcons_5

Using the hundred chart, fill in the missing numbers in the second row.

Parent Guide

Doodle-Blog-NumberIcons_1

Help your child see that moving down a row is adding ten.

Doodle-Blog-NumberIcons_2

2+10=12

Doodle-Blog-NumberIcons_3

20-5= 15

Doodle-Blog-NumberIcons_4

The missing numbers are 2, 4, 7, 8, 10

Doodle-Blog-NumberIcons_5

The missing numbers are 11, 12, 15, 17, 19

FAQs about Couting to 100

A hundred chart is a number grid with 10 rows and 10 columns, displaying the numbers 1 to 100 in order.

You read a hundred chart starting with the number 1 in the upper left-hand corner, then reading each row from left to right until you reach the number 100 in the bottom right-hand corner.

There are several differences between a number line and a hundred chart, but one main difference is that a number line can be used to represent any type of number (such as fractions, decimals, or negative integers) while a hundred chart represents whole numbers from 1-100.

There are 101 whole numbers from 0 to 100.

The prime numbers 1 to 100 are: 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97.

Group 208

Lesson credits

Katie Wickliff headshot

Katie Wickliff

Katie holds a master’s degree in Education from the University of Colorado and a bachelor’s degree in both Journalism and English from The University of Iowa. She has over 15 years of education experience as a K-12 classroom teacher and Orton-Gillingham certified tutor. Most importantly, Katie is the mother of two elementary students, ages 8 and 11. She is passionate about math education and firmly believes that the right tools and support will help every student reach their full potential.

headshot of author, Katie Wickliff

Katie Wickliff

Katie holds a master’s degree in Education from the University of Colorado and a bachelor’s degree in both Journalism and English from The University of Iowa. She has over 15 years of education experience as a K-12 classroom teacher and Orton-Gillingham certified tutor. Most importantly, Katie is the mother of two elementary students, ages 8 and 11. She is passionate about math education and firmly believes that the right tools and support will help every student reach their full potential.

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