Roman numerals
1-100: chart and practice questions

Explore the Roman numerals 1-100, learn about their history and have a go at some questions!

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Author
Sumaya Fodey

Last updated: July 17th, 2023

Roman numerals
1-100: chart and practice questions

Explore the Roman numerals 1-100, learn about their history and have a go at some questions! 

icon of a star with a smiley face

Author
Sumaya Fodey

Last updated: July 17th, 2023

Roman numerals
1-100: chart and practice questions

Explore the Roman numerals 1-100, learn about their history and have a go at some questions! 

icon of a star with a smiley face

Author
Sumaya Fodey

Last updated: July 17th, 2023

Roman numerals 1-100: chart and practice questions

Explore the Roman numerals 1-100, learn about their history and have a go at some questions!

icon of a star with a smiley face

Author
Sumaya Fodey

Last updated: July 17th, 2023

The Roman numerical system is taught in schools and is very important as it provides a valuable learning tool for understanding numerical systems and their historical context. This number system allows children to develop their problem solving skills and logical understanding of numbers, as well as how they work in combination and systems. 

In fact, we still use Roman numerals in books, video games, movie release dates, the Super Bowl, the Olympic Games and much more!

What are Roman numerals?

The Roman numerals 1-100 are a list of numbers from 1-100 in Roman translation. This numeric system originated from ancient Rome and includes a combination of letters, with each letter having a fixed value. This system drew inspiration from Etruscan numerals. 

Roman numerals are a great way to cross reference maths and history. They were widely used across Europe around 8th to 9th century BC, which was around the same time the ancient Rome was established around Palestine Hill.  

This numeric system was used well after the fall of the Roman empire (used till 14th century), until the Arabic numeric system was introduced across Europe. 

The Roman Empire used this number system for counting, recording quantities of money and writing dates. This Empire had great architectural structures, economy and society due to the incredible mathematical skills this numeric system allowed! 

What are the basic Roman numeral symbols to remember?

boy counting roman numerals 1-100

The following fixed values are the basic letters you need to remember for Roman numerals 1-100: 

I = 1  

V = 5  

X = 10  

L = 50  

C = 100 

If this seems a little overwhelming, don’t worry! DoodleMaths covers everything you need to know about Roman numerals. 

Created by teachers, DoodleMaths is an awesome app that’s filled with fun, interactive questions and games exploring the whole curriculum. Designed to be used for a few minutes a day, it’s proven to boost confidence and ability in maths – and best of all, you can try it for free!

 

How to remember basic Roman numeral symbols

Remembering each symbol/letter values can be a bit tricky, so creating a memorable sentence for each letter can make it simpler. For example:  

Isabelle  

Values 

Xylophone 

Lots 

Once you create a memorable sentence, you can start to memorise what number each letter represents. Perhaps use a flashcard to make memorisation fun! 

If you’d like to put your learning into practice and have a go at some questions, we’ve got lots you to try: why not take a look? 

How to write Roman numerals 1-100

We can work out how to write whole numbers as Roman numerals by simply using the basic digits to create the numbers in between.  

For example, the number 30 is XXX

This is because X = 10, so X + X + X = 10 + 10 + 10 = 30!

As another example, the number 25 is XXV

This is because X + X + V = 10 + 10 + 5 =25

List of Roman numerals 1-100

 
 
 
 
 
 

1 = I 

 
 
 
 

2 = II 

 
 
 
 

3 = III 

 
 
 
 

4 = IV 

 
 
 
 

5 = V 

 
 
 
 

6 = VI 

 
 

7 = VII 

 
 

8 = VIII 

 
 

9 = IX 

 
 

10 = X 

 
 
 
 

11 = XI 

 
 

12 = XII 

 
 

13 = XIII 

 
 

14 = XIV 

 
 

15 = XV 

 
 
 
 

16 = XVI 

 
 

17 = XVII 

 
 

18 = XVIII 

 
 

19 = XIX 

 
 

20 = XX 

 
 
 
 

21 = XXI 

 
 

22 = XXII 

 
 

23 = XXIII 

 
 

24 = XXIV 

 
 

25 = XXV 

 
 
 
 

26 = XXVI 

 
 

27 = XXVII 

 
 

28 = XXVIII 

 
 

29 = XXIX 

 
 

30 = XXX 

 
 
 
 

31 = XXXI 

 
 

32 = XXXII 

 
 

33 = XXXIII 

 
 

34 = XXXIV 

 
 

35 = XXXV 

 
 
 
 

36 = XXXVI 

 
 

37 = XXXVII 

 
 

38 = XXXVIII 

 
 

39 = XXXIX 

 
 

40 = XL 

 
 
 
 

41 = XLI 

 
 

42 = XLII 

 
 

43 = XLIII 

 
 

44 = XLIV 

 
 

45 = XLV 

 
 
 
 

46 = XLVI 

 
 

47 = XLVII 

 
 

48 = XLVIII 

 
 

49 = XLIX 

 
 

50 = L 

 
 
 
 

51 = LI 

 
 

52 = LII 

 
 

53 = LIII 

 
 

54 = LIV 

 
 

55 = LV 

 
 
 
 

56 = LVI 

 
 

57 = LVII 

 
 

58 = LVIII 

 
 

59 = LIX 

 
 

60 = LX 

 
 
 
 

61 = LXI 

 
 

62 = LXII 

 
 

63 = LXIII 

 
 

64 = LXIV 

 
 

65 = LXV 

 
 
 
 

66 = LXVI 

 
 

67 = LXVII 

 
 

68 = LXVIII 

 
 

69 = LXIX 

 
 

70 = LXX 

 
 
 
 

71 = LXXI 

 
 

72 = LXXII 

 
 

73 = LXXIII 

 
 

74 = LXXIV 

 
 

75 = LXXV 

 
 
 
 

76 = LXXVI 

 
 

77 = LXXVII 

 
 

78 = LXXVIII 

 
 

79 = LXXIX 

 
 

80 = LXXX 

 
 
 
 

81 = LXXXI 

 
 

82 = LXXXII 

 
 

83 = LXXXIII 

 
 

84 = LXXXIV 

 
 

85 = LXXXV 

 
 
 
 

86 = LXXXVI 

 
 

87 = LXXXVII 

 
 

88 = LXXXVIII 

 
 

89 = LXXXIX 

 
 

90 = XC 

 
 
 
 

91 = XCI 

 
 

92 = XCII 

 
 

93 = XCIII 

 
 

94 = XCIV 

 
 

95 = XCV 

 
 
 
 

96 = XCVI 

 
 

97 = XCVII 

 
 

98 = XCVIII 

 
 

99 = XCIX 

 
 

100 = C 

 

 

What are the rules for using the Roman numeric counting system?

Roman numerals are very simple and using them for calculation is just as easy if you follow a few set rules. Below are some handy things to keep in mind when using the Roman numerical system: 

  • There’s no value for 0 
  • Number is read left to right  
  • Number is added as many times the symbol/letter appears  
  • Symbol/letter can only appear 3 times. E.g., 40 ≠ XXXX, but rather XL 
  • If a smaller number/symbol appears first, then you must subtract the smaller number from the larger number. E.g., 70 = XL because XL = L – X = 50 – 10 = 40 
  • If the larger number appears first, then you add both symbols/integers. E.g., LX = 50 + 10 = 60 

Frequently asked questions about Roman numerals 1-100

To calculate the value of IV, we first need to remember the rule that if a smaller symbol appears first, we then have to subtract it from the larger symbol. 

In this instance, I is smaller than V. I = 1 and V = 5, therefore to calculate IV, you have to subtract 5 from 1, giving you 4. The value of IV = 4!

X = 10, I = 1 and V = 5.

For XIV, we need to remember two of the Roman numeral rules.

If a larger number appears first, we have to add the numbers together. But if a smaller number appears first, then we have to subtract them.

In this case, both situations occurs. As X is larger than I but I is smaller than V, you subtract V from I, then add to X. In other words, you have to calculate X + IV. 

V – I = 5 – 1 = 4. Then, you add X. So 4 + 10 = 14. XIV= 14!

This is similar to the question above. You have to take into consideration the subtracting and adding rule. Therefore, the XIX Roman numerals is X+ IX.  

X = 10 

IX = 10 – 1 = 9 

XIX =10 + 9 

XIX = 19

The Roman numeral for 4 is IV. The reason 4 isn’t IIII is because of the Roman numeral rule of not repeating a symbol more than 3 times. So IV = 5 – 1 = 4.

This question is frequently asked yet very simple! The Roman numeral for 50 is just L. This is because the symbol L has a value of 50.

X + X + I = 10 + 10 + 1 = 21. 

Therefore, the answer for XXI is 21.

XXXIII = 10 + 10 + 10 + 1 + 1 + 1 = 33. 

So XXXIII is 33!

Activity: Roman numerals 1-100 bingo

A fun way to test your knowledge of Roman numerals 1-100 is by playing a fun game of Roman numeral bingo.  

The rules are very straightforward. You have a bingo card filled with Roman numerals. An adult then calls out different numbers, and the person who has the Roman numeral equivalent on their bingo card crosses it off. The first person to have all their Roman numeric crossed off wins! 

If you’re looking for more ways to put your learning into practice, we’ve got an interactive Roman numeral question you can try – why not take a look?

In summary...

And there we have it – the ultimate guide to Roman numerals 1-100! 

If you’re looking for more ways to bring the curriculum to life, DoodleMaths has you covered.

With interactive activities to enjoy, educational games to play and rewards to unlock, your child will always look forward to maths practice – and you can try it for free! 

Meet DoodleMaths, the app that's proven to boost ability in maths!

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